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Posts tagged ‘Quran Word-to-Word’

22
Jul

The Rights of the Quran and some tips on how to fulfill them – Part 3

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

Assalamu Alaikum.

[Here are Parts 1 and 2.]

[Note: I forgot to mention one thing with regards to reciting the Quran: we are supposed to MOVE OUR LIPS.

It seems that some people think that one can recite “mentally”. They do this in the silent prayers too!

No, we need to MOVE OUR LIPS.]

In the last part, I had promised some resources for understanding the Quran so here goes:

1) Word to word translations:

If you want to buy a nice, authentic translation, then you could try out the Darussalam set. Here’s a sample page.

This one by Brother Muhammad Mohar Ali is supposed to be quite good as well, and it also gives the root words apparently (this is good for those studying grammar).

It’s available in Darussalam (in Sharjah).

Oh and here’s a nice software for mobile phones.

Some (free) online websites which provide the word to word translation are:

[Note: I haven’t checked all of them thoroughly. It’s always better to use more than one resource so as to be able to catch any errors. You can always pray Salatul Istikhara (prayer for guidance) before trying any of these out.]

http://www.allahsquran.com/learn/

http://www.emuslim.com/Quran/Translation_English.asp

http://www.quraninenglish.com/cgi-local/pages.pl?/contents

The following three sites seem to come from the same source. The last one is still new (and is still being worked on).

http://www.studyquran.co.uk/Quran_ArabicEnglish_WordforWord_Translation.htm

http://corpus.quran.com/wordbyword.jsp

http://beta.quran.com

I would advice caution with the above sites, especially the last three ones as some of the founders seem to believe in “self-studying” the Quran.

If you’re looking to learn Quranic vocabulary, you might want to use a Quranic dictionary which introduces the NEW words in a juz.

Here are two good ones:

The Easy Dictionary of the Quran

The Concise Dictionary of the Quran

Here’s a short pamphlet which goes through 80% of the words in the Quran in many languages. And here’s a nice website based on the pamphlet.

2) Various tafsirs of the Quran:

Well, I suppose this is a good time as any to advertise one of my other blogs:

http://attafsir.wordpress.com/

The aim of this blog is to gather all the authentic articles and lectures of tafsir out there, insha-Allah.

What books of tafsir are out there?

Well, there’s an abridged version of Tafsir ibn Kathir available online.

The print version is available at Darussalam.

Question:

One of my friends (who reads a LOT of Islamic literature) found Tafsir Ibn Kathir a bit “difficult” to understand. I was shocked to hear this from her (of all people).

So, my question to all of you is: How many of you feel the same way? And why?

[And no, I’m not asking just for the sake of asking. I have an idea, you see.]

Another tafsir (sort of) that you can read is the 9 volume version of Muhsin Khan’s translation. It has lots more notes than the 1 volume one. It’s also available at Darussalam.

[Question: Why is it that most people don’t know that this set exists?]

 Another tafsir that is available only for the last four juz so far (27-30) is Tafsir Minhaji. I don’t have it but I’ve heard good things about it from someone who has read it. Here’s a sample page.

Another basic tafsir that is available in English is Tafsir Ahsanul Bayan. It’s originally an Urdu work, and is quite good according to a friend of mine. The Urdu book is supposed to be just one volume but the translation is 3 volumes (and counting as they still haven’t finished the whole set)!

Why? “The font is bigger”, said the Darussalam guy.

What about other tafsirs?

Well, there are some tafsir sets which go through the whole Quran. However, they have mistakes in them. I don’t think that they are beneficial for laymen at all which is why I’m not going to mention them here.

Apart from these, there are various books which focus on just one surah like Dr. Bilal’s Tafsir Surah Al-Hujuraat. These are an excellent source of tafsir as well.

To be continued…

25
May

Post-Ramadan Teensie-Weensie Tip #5: Start learning Arabic (if you haven’t already) – Part 5

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

Assalamu Alaikum.

[Here are Parts 1, 2, 3 and 4. Please excuse me for taking so long with this series.]

8) In order to learn Arabic, you need to learn grammar and vocabulary.

[Okay, I mean in order to learn simple Arabic. You need to learn much more than just grammar and vocabulary to go deep into the Arabic language!]

By grammar, I mean two things: sarf and nahu.

To use an example I heard, sarf involves word construction and nahu involves sentence construction.

a) Sarf

Studying sarf is what really broke open the code of Arabic for me.

What is sarf exactly? Well, it is sort of like verb conjugation but it’s more than that. I think it would be pointless of me to explain because you won’t understand until you start studying it.

Arabic verb conjugation is something that will amaze you due to its simplicity – unlike in French where some verbs drive you crazy (devoir, pouvoir and vouloir, I’m talking to YOU).

For a quick way to learn some Sarf before Ramadan, I would suggest:

1) Understand Quran

2) Ustadh Fahd Al-Tahiri’s classes

b) Nahu

That’s basically learning about nouns, prepositions, etc. There’s no point in explaining this either because you need to study a bit of nahu before you understand how wonderful it is.

Both sarf and nahu can be tough in the beginning (especially if you are monolingual) but be patient and you’ll reap the rewards, insha-Allah.

A good place to start learning nahu would be the Madinah books. There are two websites where this book is explained:

1) Madinah Arabic

2) LQ Toronto

The second site has basic to advanced nahu lessons. However, a little warning: In the Madina series videos, the instructor mentions the names of  some deviant speakers and recommends their lectures (according to what I read on a website). If so, then please be careful.

Okay, what about the vocabulary?

Well, actually when you learn sarf, you’ll learn new vocabulary faster. See, each word in the Arabic language has some “root letters” so when you know the meaning of a set of root letters, you can figure out the meanings of all the words that are derived from it.

Let me give you an example from English (all these come from Latin):

Trans means “across, through, over, beyond, to or on the other side of, outside of”.

So, based on the above, can you guess what the following words mean?

Transform, transfer, transatlantic, translate, transition, etc.

Yes, to some degree, you’d have a general idea of what they meant.

Another example:

Circum means “around, about, surrounding, on all sides”.

So, based on the above, can you guess what the following words mean?

Circumvent, circumference, circumstance, etc.

Now, you might have known what  these words meant already but knowing the meaning of “circum” might have given you a deeper look into these words, thereby leading you to understanding their meanings better.

9) There are different vocabulary sets depending on what you want to understand.

If you want to understand the Quran, that’s one vocabulary set. The ahadeeth have another vocabulary set. Islamic literature has another vocabulary set (and each subject matter has it’s own vocabulary set).

If you want to study something else in Arabic, like IT or cooking, that has another vocabulary set altogether.

Of course, the above all refers to the standard Arabic. Each colloquial dialect have their own vocabulary sets as well.

Scared? Why? Isn’t this the case in every language? Think about it.

Generally speaking, sarf will help you with most of them (not the colloquial though). However, you would also need to start learning the vocabulary separately for each subject.

The first thing that you should focus on is the vocabulary of the Quran. The rest of them can come later, insha-Allah.

How can you improve on this?

Well, I can suggest three short ways before Ramadan:

– The Understand Quran courses also teach Quranic vocabulary.

– Using the dictionary of the Quran on the Understand Quran website which gives the translations of each new word, juz by juz.

– Reading the Word-to-Word translation of the Quran on a daily basis. I would recommend the Darussalam version due to its authenticity. However, the others are acceptable as well.

10) So, what will your Arabic schedule look like before Ramadan?

Well, assuming that you know how to read the Arabic letters, do not understand any Arabic at all and have not registered for any course, I would suggest:

a) Starting with the Understand Quran Short Course.

Dedicate 15 minutes in the morning to doing the course and another 15 minutes in the night to reviewing it.

b) Read at least one page of the Word-to-Word translation every day.

Write down all the new vocabulary that you’ve learnt in a notebook and keep reviewing them.

c) You could also keep listening to the Quranic recitation along with its meaning.

Here’s one with Shaikh Abdullah Basfar’s recitation (excellent tajweed).

d) After you finish all the Understand Quran lessons, you can then move on to the Madinah Arabic lessons.

Again, I should point out, that these are all suggestions. It’s okay if you don’t follow all of them. I’m just try to give you an idea of what you can start with.

Remember: The more you push yourself, the more Quran you will be able to understand in Ramadan and the more khushoo (humility) you’ll feel in the taraweeh prayers (and all the other prayers for that matter).

To be continued…

21
Feb

Website: Allah’s Quran

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

Assalamu Alaikum.

Here’s a great website for those of you who wish to read the Quran with understanding. It has audio, word-to-word and tafsir.

http://www.allahsquran.com/learn/

Really excellent stuff, maashaa-Allah.